Sail building process, step by step (almost)

All right. The dust has settled. Time to put up some pictures!

I started out the build in my garage in Tallinn where I currently work and live (in Tallinn, not in the garage). From there I took some time off work to finish things up in Finland. I put some captions under the images but there are probably things I could’ve explained more closely. If there’s anything you’re wondering, use the comment section below the post!

Hinges, prototyping

Making the first hinge prototype

Making the first hinge prototype

Trying out the hinge

Trying out the hinge

Sail sewing starts

Setting up for sail sewing

Setting up in the garage for sail sewing. The oil pit was quite handy.

Running 12 meters of canvas in a 6 meter garage is... interesting

Running 12 meters of canvas in a 6 meter garage is… interesting

Meanwhile, my dad is working in Finland

Deck partner

Deck partner

Mast step and masthead fitting

Mast step and masthead fitting

The masthead fitting close up

The masthead fitting close up

It floats!

My boat on the left, dad’s on the right

And then I take some time off work and head to Finland

My brother helping me out with the sail

Lofting. My brother is “helping” me out with the sail. At this point there are three 12 meter pieces sewed together of roughly 1.60 meter width each.

Measuring and drawing out lines for the batten pockets

Measuring and drawing out lines for the batten pockets

Batten pocket sewing starts!

Batten pocket sewing starts! This is in the old school building where I went from 1st to 4th grade and also happens to be the neighbor to my parents house. Nostalgic. I wish I had thought of using safety pins to hold the canvas in place a bit earlier, the sewing goes A LOT faster this way. This allowed me to have the sewing machine on wheels and just quickly run it over the floor instead of having to move the sail.

Yours truly working

Yours truly working

The old Koyo sewing machine

The old Koyo sewing machine. Note the clever rigging of the sewing thread. 😉

Cutting out reinforcers for the batten pocket ends

Cutting out reinforcers for the batten pocket ends

Cutting off the excess material

Cutting off the excess material

Folding the doubler inside the pocket

Folding the doubler inside the pocket

Voilà

Voilà

Using safety pins

Leech doubling reinforcement

Leech reinforcement

Leech reinforcement finished.

Leech reinforcement done

Leech reinforcement done

Hinges machined out of POM plastic

Hinges machined out of POM plastic. I ordered PVC rods that I could’ve ran through my wooden lathe instead, but the order didn’t come on time.

Integrated lazyjack sleeve and batten pocket

Integrated lazyjack sleeve and batten pocket

Battens assembled

Battens assembled using 6 mm Dyneema and a figure eight lashing secured with duct tape. Indestructible!

Close up of hinged joints

Close up of hinged joints

Setting up the batten parrels

Setting up the batten parrels

Setting up the sheets

Setting up the sheets

Attaching batten parrels around the mast

Attaching batten parrels around the mast

And the sail is up for the first time!

And the sail is up for the first time!

And off we go, first trials

And off we go, first sea trials

Time to head back to my new home port

Off to Estonia!

Off to Estonia with my good friend Robin

Safely docked at Port Noblessner, Tallinn, Estonia

Safely docked at Port Noblessner, Tallinn, Estonia

That’s pretty much it. I plan to take a longer vacation from the beginning of August and before then I have the following things to do in no specific order besides the fact that I have a lot of friends lined up to go out for a trial sail so the first two are in that sense the most urgent:

  • sew on stronger lazyjack sleeves
  • sew on batten pocket reinforcements where they contact the mast
  • start working on the Hebridean self-steering gear
  • reinforce the dog house somehow

No rest for me it would seem.

2 comments on “Sail building process, step by step (almost)
  1. Hello, I’ve just purchased my first boat and I’m already in love. It happens to be a 1969 Fingal 27′. The reason I’m writing you is because I know, and can find nothing, about this boat. I know who made and designed it but that’s about it. A few videos here, some pictures there. It’s very difficult to what I’m getting into with her without knowing her you know? Anyway, if you would like to share any information on this perticular boat we share it would be greatly appreciated. PLease, if you can, email me at [email protected]

    I look forward to hearing from you.

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